82 Percent of UK Businesses Suffered Data Breaches Last Year; Survey Sais

More than eight out of ten UK businesses have suffered a security breach in 2014, according to the 2015 Information Security Breaches Survey conducted by the British Department of Business (BIS) and accountancy company PwC.

The damages inflicted by the worst security breaches in the UK have almost tripled last year, as the average cost for a big business that suffered a security breach starts from £1.46 million, compared to £600,000 in 2014.

"With 9 out of 10 respondents reporting a cyber breach in the past year, every organisation needs to be considering how they defend and deal with the cyber threats they face," saidAndrew Miller, Cyber Security Director at PwC ."Breaches are becoming increasingly sophisticated, often involving internal staff to amplify their effect, and the impacts we are seeing are increasingly long-lasting and costly to deal with."

The survey also revealed that 90 percent of large organizations have suffered a security breach, while 74 percent of small and medium-sized companies have reported the same problem.

Close to 60 percent of respondents are pessimistic about the next year, saying that there will be more incidents compared to the last one.

"Companies implementing Cyber Essentials can thwart the majority of current cyber attacks, making the programme potentially the biggest single contribution to cutting cyber crime," Tony Morbin, SC Magazine Editor-in-Chief concluded. "It is most certainly a worthy winner, as are all the partners across government and industry who have worked together to design, manage and deliver the program.

"This article has been provided by the courtesy of Lucian Ciolacu, Editor at SecurityPitch."

Read more...

For Working Parents Protecting Children from Internet Dangers During Work Hours is Key

Parents are becoming increasingly aware of the dangers the Internet presents to children. Thankfully, legislation is requiring that schools and public locations such as libraries have Internet filtering software in place. However, parents must still grapple with the challenges of protecting their children at home. In particular, working parents must consider their options for managing and protecting children’s access to the Internet from the workplace or at times they are away. One product is currently leading out in this capability: Netnanny -

https://cybersecureltd.com/product/net-nanny-7-windows

Netnany is a flexible, low-cost and easy-to-use software program with versions for businesses and home users. For parents, the ability to apply professional-level controls to their home computers is providing them with new peace of mind. For example, Cheryl Snapp Conner, a working mother of two pre-teen children, recently discovered that personal supervision of her children’s Internet activities is no longer enough. Snapp Conner is co-owner of the Snapp Norris Group (SNG) public relations agency in Draper, Utah. Most of the time, Snapp Conner is able to manage her concerns for her children by working from her home office when her children are there. However, she recently added new protection that she can manage and monitor remotely from the office via ContentProtect. “I make it a practice to always know when my daughter is on the computer, and to know who she is instant messaging,” Snapp Conner said. “But we’re discovering that physical supervision is no longer enough. I’m not highly technical, but when I need to be away from home at my office, it’s essential that I know my children are safe and that I be able to monitor and manage those computers remotely.” Several weeks ago, a friend persuaded Snapp Conner’s 14-year-old daughter to set up an account on MySpace. Although it was against family rules, under peer pressure, the daughter learned how to falsify her age and set up the account without her mother’s knowledge. When Snapp Conner discovered the situation and saw the material being posted, she was horrified. In just two days, her daughter had been solicited by complete strangers. One posting was from a youth named “Alex” who listed his age as “99” and was bragging about his sexual performance. Another message was from a 30year-old man. P
Snapp Conner had heard from a professional associate that he was able to monitor his home computers remotely with ContentProtect. She immediately obtained the software and gave it a try.
The software pops up with a suggested template for filter settings that is simple to modify. Snapp Conner was also able to define acceptable parameters by username for the different family members who use the system. The parent could grant a college student, for example, more liberal access than a 14-year-old child. The software also makes it easy to “black list” or “white list” sites that should always be available or should never be available to a particular user. “I made MySpace completely off-limits to my daughter,” Snapp Conner said. “I contacted MySpace directly to require them to take down her account. But her friend was trying to coach her in ways to get around the software and set it back up. I could see them struggling to find every way around the filtering software. They failed.” Remote management from the office was critical as well. “I needed to go to the office for three hours while my daughter was home,” Snapp Conner reported. “Pretty soon I was getting e-mail alerts that my daughter was attempting to pull up a Google Image Search on ‘hot sexy guys’. I called my daughter immediately and told her that the system not only blocks that kind of activities, but it also sends me an automatic message to let me know what she attempted to access.” “My daughter stammered and sputtered and then she admitted a friend had talked her into the search, telling her she could get around the system by running a Google search. It didn’t work. She apologized and assured me she’ll never do it again.” Remote management is more important than ever, Snapp Conner continued. Now it’s possible to set up the computer so that a parent can know if a child is slipping home from school to use the computer during the day. It’s also easy to make adjustments to the software profile remotely, if needed. For example, if a child is working on homework that requires them to access a site that is being blocked out due to gaming or chat rooms, for example, the parent can consider the question and quickly grant permission from their office or from any browser interface. For Snapp Conner, the knowledge that the filtering software is in place has solved 90 percent of her problems. 
“The software is simple to install, even for a novice,” she reports. “If it’s needed, the customer support is also exceptionally good.”
“Now my daughter—and my 11-year-old-son—know that the system is in place and that they can’t break it,” she said. “It’s pretty tough to argue with a machine. And the knowledge that Mom is going to see what they’re trying to get into is keeping them responsible, too. We’re also thrilled that the performance of our computer hasn’t been affected at all. Our family PC runs as fast as it ever did. ContentProtect has been a perfect solution for me.”

To learn more - arents are becoming increasingly aware of the dangers the Internet presents to children. Thankfully, legislation is requiring that schools and public locations such as libraries have Internet filtering software in place. However, parents must still grapple with the challenges of protecting their children at home. In particular, working parents must consider their options for managing and protecting children’s access to the Internet from the workplace or at times they are away. One product is currently leading out in this capability: ContentProtect, from ContentWatch (www.contentwatch.com). ContentProtect is a flexible, low-cost and easy-to-use software program with versions for businesses and home users. For parents, the ability to apply professional-level controls to their home computers is providing them with new peace of mind. For example, Cheryl Snapp Conner, a working mother of two pre-teen children, recently discovered that personal supervision of her children’s Internet activities is no longer enough. Snapp Conner is co-owner of the Snapp Norris Group (SNG) public relations agency in Draper, Utah. Most of the time, Snapp Conner is able to manage her concerns for her children by working from her home office when her children are there. However, she recently added new protection that she can manage and monitor remotely from the office via ContentProtect. “I make it a practice to always know when my daughter is on the computer, and to know who she is instant messaging,” Snapp Conner said. “But we’re discovering that physical supervision is no longer enough. I’m not highly technical, but when I need to be away from home at my office, it’s essential that I know my children are safe and that I be able to monitor and manage those computers remotely.” Several weeks ago, a friend persuaded Snapp Conner’s 14-year-old daughter to set up an account on MySpace. Although it was against family rules, under peer pressure, the daughter learned how to falsify her age and set up the account without her mother’s knowledge. When Snapp Conner discovered the situation and saw the material being posted, she was horrified. In just two days, her daughter had been solicited by complete strangers. One posting was from a youth named “Alex” who listed his age as “99” and was bragging about his sexual performance. Another message was from a 30year-old man. P
Snapp Conner had heard from a professional associate that he was able to monitor his home computers remotely with ContentProtect. She immediately obtained the software and gave it a try.
The software pops up with a suggested template for filter settings that is simple to modify. Snapp Conner was also able to define acceptable parameters by username for the different family members who use the system. The parent could grant a college student, for example, more liberal access than a 14-year-old child. The software also makes it easy to “black list” or “white list” sites that should always be available or should never be available to a particular user. “I made MySpace completely off-limits to my daughter,” Snapp Conner said. “I contacted MySpace directly to require them to take down her account. But her friend was trying to coach her in ways to get around the software and set it back up. I could see them struggling to find every way around the filtering software. They failed.” Remote management from the office was critical as well. “I needed to go to the office for three hours while my daughter was home,” Snapp Conner reported. “Pretty soon I was getting e-mail alerts that my daughter was attempting to pull up a Google Image Search on ‘hot sexy guys’. I called my daughter immediately and told her that the system not only blocks that kind of activities, but it also sends me an automatic message to let me know what she attempted to access.” “My daughter stammered and sputtered and then she admitted a friend had talked her into the search, telling her she could get around the system by running a Google search. It didn’t work. She apologized and assured me she’ll never do it again.” Remote management is more important than ever, Snapp Conner continued. Now it’s possible to set up the computer so that a parent can know if a child is slipping home from school to use the computer during the day. It’s also easy to make adjustments to the software profile remotely, if needed. For example, if a child is working on homework that requires them to access a site that is being blocked out due to gaming or chat rooms, for example, the parent can consider the question and quickly grant permission from their office or from any browser interface. For Snapp Conner, the knowledge that the filtering software is in place has solved 90 percent of her problems. 
“The software is simple to install, even for a novice,” she reports. “If it’s needed, the customer support is also exceptionally good.”
“Now my daughter—and my 11-year-old-son—know that the system is in place and that they can’t break it,” she said. “It’s pretty tough to argue with a machine. And the knowledge that Mom is going to see what they’re trying to get into is keeping them responsible, too. We’re also thrilled that the performance of our computer hasn’t been affected at all. Our family PC runs as fast as it ever did. ContentProtect has been a perfect solution for me.”

Read more...

Why Businesses should monitor and secure mobile phones?

Internet usage is on the rise – thanks to advancements in technology. Mobile technology has become a game-changer in how business organizations run their operations, both small and large businesses are making efforts to maximize the advantages posed by this technology. A research conducted by Samsung indicates that mobile technology is becoming more essential in the workplace than never before (Waugh, 2019).  Mobile technology enables businesses to run operations with much ease; this is because the devices support remote communication, storing and analyzing of information shared.

However, business companies are faced with a major issue of safeguarding mobile phones. Business organizations have become dependent on the use of mobile computing to increase their performance as well as reach out to a more extensive client base. With the increase of popularity and significance of mobile computing in business operations, managers should find ways of ensuring that these devices are properly secured. Securing mobile phones in the workplace is not an easy task; this is due to their ease of portability. Dissatisfied employees and other malicious actors can easily steal these gadgets without being noticed. What should organizations do?

Apart from enforcing physical security controls, organizations should ensure that these mobile devices can be tracked and located when stolen.  Our app allows users to track mobile phones easily; this will aid in the recovery process in case of theft or loss.

In this digital age, business organizations have become dependent on the use of data. Data plays an integral part in the success of businesses; a company that can maximize the vast amounts of data collected is more likely to be successful. Mobile technology is now widely being applied in business organizations to store and manage data. The speeds at which mobile phones relay and receive information have made mobile computing the ideal technology for business processes. In a workplace environment, mobile phones are used to improve coordination by making communication and sharing of resources easier.

However, this technology can be used for the wrong purpose. For instance, employees may use these devices to communicate with their family and friends on matters that are not business-related. Employees can also use mobile phones to access social media platforms and other sites that have no business value to the organization. Just like any other technology, mobile phones can also cause distraction in any work environment. It is, therefore, the responsibility of the business managers to monitor the usage of mobile phones and ensure that they are only used for appropriate purposes. 

Businesses should also ensure that critical information shared and stored by mobile phones is properly guarded against unauthorized access. With cyber-attacks becoming more prevalent, companies have become more susceptible to attacks. Cyber-attacks can lead to loss of critical data and other assets that can cripple business operations. Protecting and securing access to critical business documents is mandatory. Our app is built with the latest security features that guarantee the security of data and information and helps keep mobile phones safe from threats (cyber-attacks), prevents data loss and monitors social media usage giving managers a comprehensive report.

Read more...

DESTROYING THE MYTH! SMALL BUSINESSES NEED A SECURITY SOLUTION

Everybody dreams of becoming their own boss. Managing a business means making your own rules, while using your time as you see fit. Sounds great, but you need to consider the competition from big players, the increasing expectations from digital savvy customers, the pressure of finding new clients while also controlling costs. Plus, there’s always the challenge of adapting to the latest tech advancements!

With all these necessities, information security is often disregarded. This happens because most business owners don’t realize how important their business and ultimately, their data, is.

First of all, there’s nothing small about SMBs. SMBs play a vital role in the economy. They make up nearly 99 percent of US employment firms and account for more than half of the new jobs created in the past decade. A recent study predicts that SMBs will contribute to 40% of worldwide public cloud spending by 2019.

Hackers have long realized the value of SMBs. Yes, spectacular, sophisticated attacks on big companies like Target or Anthem grab the attention of the media, but there are actually more SMBs targeted than larger organizations. In fact, in 2015, small-businesses were prime targets for cyber-thieves.

As we have seen, POS malware campaigns are on the rise, making victims from multiple industries and locations across the globe. Healthcare providers, retailers, hotel chains, dental clinics, machine manufacturers, technology companies, beauty supply shops – everyone is affected by the same credit card stealing threat.

Social engineering emails carrying remote access Trojans (RATs), have been seen infecting US and UK businesses. Financial malware hidden in innocuous Word documents stole millions of online banking credentials.

Ransomware, the virus that locks up files in exchange of a ransom, has also been blackmailing SMBs. And since a modern business relies heavily on its digital assets to satisfy customers and fears public shaming, it becomes particularly vulnerable. As a result, CryptoWall 3.0, one of the most complex versions of this type of malware, made its creators $350 million richer last year.

Why are SMBs preferred targets?

First of all, small businesses underestimate the importance of their data. Every business has confidential, proprietary information, such as employee salaries, revenue numbers or customers’ credit card details. That’s what cyber-criminals value most. Also, small businesses are a piece in a bigger puzzle. If they do business with larger companies, most likely they are being used to get to the ultimate target.

Secondly, SMBs have a high return on investment. Since malware has become so sophisticated to leave no traces behind after it captures the data it needs, and with the possibility to buy malware online anonymously, the results overweigh the risks.

Lastly, small businesses are easier prays than larger enterprises. The bigger the business, the more IT experts and security systems it will have in place to fend off cyber-threats.

Unfortunately, entrepreneurs not only put security on the back seat of their business priorities, but also underestimate the impact a leak of proprietary information may have on their reputation, credibility and ultimately profits.

But the truth is…a security breach can devastate a small or midsize business.

One unlucky click – a malicious email attachment, a link to a legitimate but compromised website – can result in a costly data breach that drains bank accounts and customer trust. A 2012 study by the National Cyber Security Alliance found that 60 percent of small firms go out of business within six months of a data breach.

If you’re an entrepreneur, these facts probably put things into perspective. But there’s not need to panic, there are solutions. The first thing you can do to prevent cyber-threats is invest in a dedicated endpoint security solution that suits your exact needs.

Also, remember, it’s extremely important that you begin educating employees on the risks of careless online behavior, weak passwords, phishing schemes and other threats that may fool them into giving access to your network and assets.

Read more...